Montana – Heart Of America Northwest http://heartofamericanorthwest.org/ Mon, 16 May 2022 12:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-49.png Montana – Heart Of America Northwest http://heartofamericanorthwest.org/ 32 32 Fort Harrison Veterans’ Hospital Celebrates 100 Years | Montana News https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/fort-harrison-veterans-hospital-celebrates-100-years-montana-news/ Mon, 16 May 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/fort-harrison-veterans-hospital-celebrates-100-years-montana-news/ Fort Harrison Veterans’ Hospital will celebrate its 100th anniversary on May 20 with an outdoor event open to the public that includes a health fair with music, ceremony, parade and campus tour. “We are beyond excited and thrilled,” said Dr. Judy Hayman, executive director of the Montana Veterans Health System, of the Helena area hospital […]]]>

Fort Harrison Veterans’ Hospital will celebrate its 100th anniversary on May 20 with an outdoor event open to the public that includes a health fair with music, ceremony, parade and campus tour.

“We are beyond excited and thrilled,” said Dr. Judy Hayman, executive director of the Montana Veterans Health System, of the Helena area hospital that passed the century milestone.

The festivities begin with a health fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. There is an anniversary ceremony from 11 a.m. to noon, an emergency services parade at 12:15 p.m. just south of the main hospital, followed by campus tours by the Last Chance Tourist Train from 12:30 p.m. 2 p.m.

The ceremony will be streamed live on the Montana VA Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/VAMontana.






Fort Harrison Hospital in the 1920s.




Originally named Veterans Hospital No. 72, Fort Harrison began as an army post in 1892. Officials said the original hospital, which still stands, was built in 1895 and is within sight of the current installation. On May 19, 1922, the hospital was taken over by the Veterans Affairs Bureau.







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This 1894 story from The Helena Independent shows plans for the Fort Harrison Hospital.




Government officials originally named the fort after Benjamin Harrison, who was the incumbent US President. But in 1906, after realizing that a fort in Indianapolis shared the same name, they renamed it after US President William Henry Harrison, who was Benjamin Harrison’s grandfather.

The original post was 3,809 acres and army troops were stationed there from 1895 to 1892.

The hospital has undergone several changes over the years with several new buildings added and several existing structures serving a new purpose.

The First World War created a great demand for hospital beds. By June 6, 1921, all buildings at Fort Harrison had been adapted for hospital use and it became U.S. Public Hospital No. 72, with a capacity of 150 beds. On June 30, 1923, it was increased to 300 beds and became a designated tuberculosis hospital. But in 1925 the need for these beds diminished and the hospital reverted to a general medical and surgical facility.







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Fort Harrison Hospital in 1932.




In 1932, a new infirmary and clinical hospital building was constructed at a cost of over $500,000.

In October 1935, there were serious seismic disturbances; the epicenter being located approximately 7 miles northeast of the VA facility. On October 31, 1935, the second most severe earthquake cracked the top of the power plant’s chimney and the heating plant had to be shut down.

There were 197 patients in the hospital; some were discharged or transferred to other VA hospitals in Walla Walla, Washington and Roseberg, Oregon.

It was determined that repairs would be made, and the hospital was reopened on February 15, 1937.

In June 1961, a contract was awarded to build a new $4 million hospital that had 96,000 square feet of floor space and 160 beds. It was dedicated on September 29, 1963.







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This is an undated photograph of Fort Harrison VA.










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This photo shows rehabilitation at Fort Harrison VA in 1975.




A contract for the second phase of Fort Harrison’s modernization was awarded on June 29, 1963, which included remodeling the interior of the old hospital building to make room for all regional office operations and the medical administrative staff. This building now serves as an administrative building.

Other changes include:

  • A new ambulatory addition was completed in 1976 at the rear of the hospital building, providing 13,000 square feet for ambulatory activities. A 5,400 square foot pharmacy addition was made in 1981.
  • In 1985, the Montana State Veterans Cemetery was established on the Fort Harrison campus. The first burial took place in September 1987.
  • In 1995, a two-story addition was completed to the front of the hospital, providing space for surgical, dental, and radiology departments and a covered entrance for the hospital’s main entrance.
  • In 2006, the Liberty House was completed and funded by the non-profit group Liberty House Foundation. This eight-room facility provides free lodging for family members of hospitalized veterans, while their loved ones are cared for at the medical center.
  • In 2006, the VBA regional office completed construction of a new 20,000 square foot building located on the Fort Harrison campus and in 2007, 18,000 square feet was added to ameliorate space shortages for areas specialized care.
  • In 2019, the original officers’ quarters were renovated and turned into HUD/VASH housing managed by Freedom’s Path. The MTVAHCS HUD/VASH Permanent Housing Program administers housing vouchers statewide. Forty-two of the total vouchers are project-based housing units located on campus.

Construction of a new $12 million primary care building was completed in 2021.

Hayman said the future of the hospital promises changes and advancements in health care and the ability for more veterans to receive care.

She noted that over the past 1 1/2 years, the VA has opened seven new clinics in Montana, “bringing state-of-the-art facilities (closer) closer to veterinarians.”

Associate Editor Phil Drake can be reached at 406-231-9021.

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Montana State baseball club season ends one game away from regional title game | montana-state-university https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/montana-state-baseball-club-season-ends-one-game-away-from-regional-title-game-montana-state-university/ Sun, 15 May 2022 03:45:00 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/montana-state-baseball-club-season-ends-one-game-away-from-regional-title-game-montana-state-university/ BOISE, Idaho — The Montana State club baseball team opened the North Pacific Regional Tournament with an upset victory, but its season ended Saturday night at Memorial Stadium. In their first regional tournament in program history, the fourth-seeded Bobcats had two chances Saturday to reach Sunday’s championship game. They lost the first 14-4 to top-seeded […]]]>

BOISE, Idaho — The Montana State club baseball team opened the North Pacific Regional Tournament with an upset victory, but its season ended Saturday night at Memorial Stadium.

In their first regional tournament in program history, the fourth-seeded Bobcats had two chances Saturday to reach Sunday’s championship game. They lost the first 14-4 to top-seeded Utah State, then fell 17-7 to third-seeded Oregon. MSU finished the season with a 9-9 record.

“I just ran out of gas,” MSU coach Joe Hoy wrote in a text message. “The target was to play three games in this regional, however, and they achieved that target.”

MSU moved closer to the title game with a 9-3 win over Oregon State on Friday night. OSU was 19-2 and ranked No. 7 in the National Club Baseball Association’s final poll before the game, which the Cats led 4-0 in four innings and 6-3 in five. They scored their last three points in the top of the seventh.

Tristen Delaney pitched a full game against OSU, allowing three earned runs on 10 hits and a walk with four strikeouts. Justin Cervi Cervi hit 3 for 5 with a double and four RBIs.

People also read…

“A good year with lots of positives to build on next year,” Hoy wrote.

Email Victor Flores at victor.flores@406mtsports.com and follow him on Twitter at @VictorFlores406

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Montana State men have even more to-do list and schedule | Men’s Basketball Bobcats https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/montana-state-men-have-even-more-to-do-list-and-schedule-mens-basketball-bobcats/ Tue, 10 May 2022 20:38:00 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/montana-state-men-have-even-more-to-do-list-and-schedule-mens-basketball-bobcats/ Country united states of americaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic ofBarbadosBelarusBelgium, […]]]>

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Few eligible families have applied for federal payment of COVID funeral expenses https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/few-eligible-families-have-applied-for-federal-payment-of-covid-funeral-expenses/ Mon, 09 May 2022 09:01:00 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/few-eligible-families-have-applied-for-federal-payment-of-covid-funeral-expenses/ On a wet August afternoon in 2020, two caskets – one silver, one white – sat near holes in the ground during a small funeral service in the town of Travelers Rest, SC The family had just lost a mom and a dad, both to COVID. “They died five days apart,” says Allison Leaver, who […]]]>

On a wet August afternoon in 2020, two caskets – one silver, one white – sat near holes in the ground during a small funeral service in the town of Travelers Rest, SC

The family had just lost a mom and a dad, both to COVID.

“They died five days apart,” says Allison Leaver, who now lives in Maryland with her husband and children.

When Leaver’s parents died that summer, it was a crushing tragedy. And there was no life insurance or burial policy to help cover the expenses.

“We just thought we were going to have to put this on our credit cards and pay it off, and that’s how we were going to handle it,” the public school teacher said with a resigned laugh.

But then, in April 2021, FEMA offered to reimburse funeral expenses — up to $9,000, which is about the average cost of a funeral. And it was retroactive.

Leaver applied immediately.

“If this horrible thing were to happen, at least we weren’t going to lose money,” she says.

A year after the program began, the federal government has provided more than $2 billion to cover funeral costs for COVID victims. More than 300,000 families have received reimbursement, averaging $6,500. But less than half of the families have started the applications.

Many surviving family members have encountered difficulties or are still unaware that the money is available.

For those who know

FEMA launched a large call center, hiring 4,000 contractors in Denver. Survivors should call to initiate the process, as applications are not being accepted online. FEMA received a million calls on the first day, leaving many waiting on hold.

Once Leaver spoke to a representative, she began assembling death certificates and receipts from the funeral home and cemetery. She downloaded them online – and heard nothing for months.

Eventually, she called and learned that the receipts she had submitted bore different signatures – one from her husband, one from her sister. It was a problem. Even though it was a joint funeral, in order to get the full amount per parent, the government required separate receipts. Leaver says she was frustrated, but determined to make it “against all odds.” Besides, she said, it was summer vacation and she had time.

But many have not applied or do not have time.

Administrative challenges discouraged some participation, especially for those whose loved ones died early in the pandemic, says Jaclyn Rothenberg, FEMA’s chief spokeswoman.

“Some people with death certificates didn’t necessarily have COVID as the cause of death,” she says. “We have a responsibility to our taxpayer stewards to make sure that’s the cause.”

Rothenberg says FEMA tries to work with everyone. Even though the agency has spent the originally budgeted $2 billion, it says there is a new pot of stimulus funding from the American Rescue Plan Act.

For those who don’t know

NPR analyzed FEMA data against official COVID deaths through March 15, 2022. Washington, DC, led the nation with claims for 77% of deaths. States clustered in the South had the highest participation rate in the program, with North Carolina approaching claims for two-thirds of deaths. Other states remain well below a 50% participation rate. In Oregon and Washington, less than one in three deaths resulted in a claim.

It’s usually not a question of eligibility. There is no income limit and life insurance does not prevent participation. And there is still no time limit. One of the few disqualifiers (detailed here) is if the funeral was prepaid.

“We need people to keep helping us spread the word,” Rothenberg says. “We know we still have work to do.”

FEMA is launching an awareness campaign to promote the program because there is plenty of money left. The agency focuses on the populous states of California, New York, Pennsylvania and Texas, and its efforts target vulnerable populations.

The government also relies on community groups linked to those who need to know the money the most.

COVID Survivors for Change, founded by Chris Kocher, is helping people navigate the process, including through a Facebook webinar.

“We were able to connect people with some of the survivors who had already gone through this process just to help them through it,” he says.

Many just need someone to fill out the application for them.

Stephanie Smith of Carlisle, Ky., lost her father to COVID. His mother, who was 83 at the time, didn’t stand a chance.

“She’s a very smart and brave woman, but she’s never used a computer,” Smith said.

At a minimum, the application requires scanning or faxing.

“She probably wouldn’t have attempted it because the whole process would have been overwhelming for her,” she says.

But Smith was able to jump through the hoops without too much trouble. And $9,000, she says, is enough to make life considerably easier as her mother adjusts to being a COVID widow.

This story comes from NPR’s health reporting partnership with Nashville Public Radio and Kaiser Health News (KHN).

Copyright 2022 WPLN News

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Montana Fishing Film Festival presents new short films | Sports https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/montana-fishing-film-festival-presents-new-short-films-sports/ Tue, 03 May 2022 23:34:00 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/montana-fishing-film-festival-presents-new-short-films-sports/ Contribution via the Montana Fishing Film Festival website Montana Fishing Film Festival: Where people passionate about the art of fishing gather to watch short films on April 23. Self-proclaimed “the most fun you can have off the river”, it aimed to feature as much diversity as possible despite filming. in small towns in Montana. Groups […]]]>









Montana Fishing Film Festival: Where people passionate about the art of fishing gather to watch short films on April 23. Self-proclaimed “the most fun you can have off the river”, it aimed to feature as much diversity as possible despite filming. in small towns in Montana.

Groups of fans in jeans and caps entered the Dennison Theater to chat with friends, drink beer and watch fishing movies. The theater was filled with laughter and cheers throughout the night. This year’s event featured eight films from a few different filmmakers.

“I think this film festival, distinct from all other fly fishing film festivals, is truly dedicated to diversity, inclusion and representation of all people who fly fish, including women, people of color, mothers, etc.”, one of the women in the films, Gracie Mills, said.

The festival began at Crystal Palace, a Missoula venue that is now permanently closed. It all started because one of Matt Devlin’s friends made a movie, and they got people together to watch it. Nine years later, Devlin is now in charge of the festival, and even directs films himself.

The film festival partners with the Montana Film Office and Yeti, among other sponsors. The festival grew from that first night in the salon du Palais and has continued to grow. Although they couldn’t be together for nearly 3 years due to the pandemic, dozens of anglers came out to support the films this year. T-shirts, hats and beer were sold outside, along with raffle tickets to win a fishing rod and other door prizes.

Most of the volunteers and workers were friends or supporters of the filmmakers or the festival as a whole. The WestSlope chapter of Trout Unlimited has partnered with the film festival organization to raise funds. Trout Unlimited supports cold water habitats for fishing and other animals. The fishing community in and around Missoula is interconnected, and everyone tries to help each other reach and teach more people the art of fly fishing.

The festival-goers were mostly locals from the Missoula and surrounding areas, and many knew each other and the filmmakers from the fishing community. Some came to fish and others came to support friends and family.

“It would be great to get more out-of-state people and people who are traveling just to recognize that it’s taking place,” guest Mike Dejorup said. These “grassroots” film festivals are very important for small filmmakers and can help them get more gigs and exposure.

A group of women included in one of the films traveled from Oregon to support filmmaker and friend Katie Falkenberg. Her film, On the Edge, features four women hunting cutthroat trout in the backcountry.

“I created a film, On the Edge, about a rafting and fly-fishing trip in Montana last summer, and I thought it was important that as we prepared to leave , we were noticing the effects of climate change on rivers across the west, and even in our home state of Oregon,” Falkenberg said. “I think it’s really important to start telling these stories, so I wanted to incorporate adventure, women, friendship and camaraderie, and the issues we face in our rivers and fisheries.”

Many films have focused on conservation and show how fly fishing is an art. Some have tried to show off how pretty the fish are, like the latest feature, All Gas, No Brakes, which is labeled on the website as “truit porn.”

The films showed diversity and inclusion, even in the small towns and rivers of Montana. This festival is a change from the white male stereotype of fishing and is encouraging for those new to the sport.

“It’s really become a safe place to show films about everyone in sports, women, we like to bring diversity to it, and so we were able to kind of use the platform that we built in nine years to kind of spread the message that fly fishing is something for everyone,” Devlin said.

All films are available for viewing on mtfishingfilmfest.com.

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Condors once again soar over the coastal redwoods of northern California https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/condors-once-again-soar-over-the-coastal-redwoods-of-northern-california/ Tue, 03 May 2022 21:55:00 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/condors-once-again-soar-over-the-coastal-redwoods-of-northern-california/ REDWOOD NATIONAL PARK, Calif. — The endangered Californian condor returned on Tuesday to soar above the state’s northern coastal redwood forests for the first time in more than a century. Two captive-bred birds have been released from an enclosure in Redwood National Park, about an hour’s drive south of the Oregon border, as part of […]]]>

REDWOOD NATIONAL PARK, Calif. — The endangered Californian condor returned on Tuesday to soar above the state’s northern coastal redwood forests for the first time in more than a century.

Two captive-bred birds have been released from an enclosure in Redwood National Park, about an hour’s drive south of the Oregon border, as part of a project to restore giant vultures to their historic habitat in the Pacific Northwest.

The two male condors were moved to the staging area in the late morning and a remote controlled gate was opened. After a few minutes of carefully observing the opening, the birds climbed through the opening one by one, spread their giant wings and took off.

“They just jumped up and flew away,” Tiana Williams-Claussen, wildlife director for the area’s Yurok Tribe, said in a webcast.

Condors were last spotted in the park area around 1892, authorities said. The California condor is North America’s largest native bird, with a wingspan of nearly 10 feet (3 meters). The scavenger was once widespread but had all but disappeared by the 1970s due to poaching, lead poisoning from the consumption of animals shot by hunters, and habitat destruction.

The birds can live up to 60 years and fly great distances in search of carrion, so their range could span multiple states.

Federal and local fish and wildlife agencies are involved in the restoration project led by the Yurok tribe, which has traditionally considered the California condor a sacred animal and has worked for years to bring the species back to the land. ancestor of the tribe.

“For countless generations, the Yurok people have borne the sacred responsibility of maintaining balance in the natural world. The reintroduction of the Condor is a concrete manifestation of our cultural commitment to restoring and protecting the planet for future generations,” said Tribal Chairman Joseph L. James. said in a statement.

Two more condors were due to be released later – after biologists determined the two birds that took flight on Tuesday displayed appropriate behavior, authorities said.

The condors, including one female and three males, are between 2 and 4 years old. Two were hatched at the Oregon Zoo and two at the Peregrine Fund World Center for Birds of Prey in Idaho.

In the early 1980s, the 22 condors remaining in the wild were trapped and incorporated into a captive breeding program that began releasing the giant vultures into Los Padres National Forest in southern California. , in 1992.

This herd has expanded its range while other condors now occupy parts of the central coast of California, Arizona, Utah and Baja California, Mexico. The total population now numbers over 500 birds in captivity and in the wild.

Two years ago, California condors were spotted in Sequoia National Park in California’s Sierra Nevada for the first time in nearly 50 years.

However, that same year, a dozen adults and two chicks died when a wildfire ignited by an arsonist swept through their territory on the Big Sur coast.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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WATCH: LA Rams Select Montana St. LB Daniel Hardy at No. 235 in the NFL Draft https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/watch-la-rams-select-montana-st-lb-daniel-hardy-at-no-235-in-the-nfl-draft/ Sun, 01 May 2022 16:41:51 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/watch-la-rams-select-montana-st-lb-daniel-hardy-at-no-235-in-the-nfl-draft/ On Saturday, the Los Angeles Rams had the 218th pick in the NFL Draft. But a surprise trade with the Buccaneers saw the pick head to Tampa Bay in exchange for the 235th and 261st picks. And with the 235th pick in the draft, LA selected Montana State linebacker Daniel Hardy in the seventh round. […]]]>

On Saturday, the Los Angeles Rams had the 218th pick in the NFL Draft. But a surprise trade with the Buccaneers saw the pick head to Tampa Bay in exchange for the 235th and 261st picks.

And with the 235th pick in the draft, LA selected Montana State linebacker Daniel Hardy in the seventh round.

Daniel Hardy

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Daniel Hardy

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Daniel Hardy

Hardy, a 6-3, 240-pound native of Beaverton, Oregon, was a first-team All-Big Sky selection last season after starting all 15 games for the Bobcats. He had 24.5 tackles for loss, the third in a single season in Montana State history. Hardy also had an impressive 16.5 sacks, which was sixth for FCS and fourth for a season in school history.

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Former Montana WR Samori Toure drafted by Green Bay Packers | Grizzlies UM https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/former-montana-wr-samori-toure-drafted-by-green-bay-packers-grizzlies-um/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 23:25:00 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/former-montana-wr-samori-toure-drafted-by-green-bay-packers-grizzlies-um/ MISSOULA — Former Montana wide receiver Samori Toure gets a shot in the National Football League. Toure was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the seventh round with the 258th overall pick on Saturday. Only 262 players were drafted, making him the fifth-to-last prospect to be picked. Toure’s selection ends the Grizzlies’ draft drought […]]]>

MISSOULA — Former Montana wide receiver Samori Toure gets a shot in the National Football League.

Toure was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the seventh round with the 258th overall pick on Saturday. Only 262 players were drafted, making him the fifth-to-last prospect to be picked.

Toure’s selection ends the Grizzlies’ draft drought as he became the first player to be selected since 2016, when defensive end Tyrone Holmes was selected in the sixth round by the Jacksonville Jaguars. He is also UM’s first offensive player to be drafted since 2010, when wide receiver Marc Mariani was selected in the seventh round by the Tennessee Titans.

Toure, 24, joins a Green Bay team led by quarterback Aaron Rodgers, who won his fourth NFL MVP award last season. The Packers selected three wide receivers for this draft, with the other two being North Dakota State’s Christian Watson (No. 34 overall pick) and Nevada’s Romeo Doubs (No. 132 overall pick).

Toure spent four seasons at Montana after being recruited by former Griz head coach Bob Stitt from Portland, Oregon. His best season came as a junior in 2019, when he earned All-American accolades, set school records for single-season receptions (82), receiving single-season yards (1,495), and receiving yards in a game (279), and broke the FCS playoff record for receiving yards in a game (303).

Toure finished his Griz career with 155 catches for 2,488 yards and 20 touchdowns, putting him on pace to set career records in multiple categories at UM. He had decided to stay with Montana for his final year of eligibility in 2020, but that season was postponed until the spring due to the pandemic.

Touré then opted for a graduate transfer to Nebraska in hopes of increasing his draft stock. He earned honorable mention All-Big Ten status while catching 46 passes for 898 yards and five touchdowns. His draft stock increased at the East-West Shrine Bowl in February and Nebraska’s Pro Day in March.

—Frank Gogola, 406mtsports.com

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Billings Senior Graduate Gabe Sulser Swaps Montana Maroon for Texas Burnt Orange | Montana grizzlies https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/billings-senior-graduate-gabe-sulser-swaps-montana-maroon-for-texas-burnt-orange-montana-grizzlies/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/billings-senior-graduate-gabe-sulser-swaps-montana-maroon-for-texas-burnt-orange-montana-grizzlies/ BILLING — Gabe Sulser isn’t quite sure how or when, but somewhere along the way he became a fan of the lore and what he perceived to be the culture of the University of Texas football program. Sulzer Sulser’s family occasionally played a game around the house and asked him if he could go play […]]]>

BILLING — Gabe Sulser isn’t quite sure how or when, but somewhere along the way he became a fan of the lore and what he perceived to be the culture of the University of Texas football program.






Sulzer


Sulser’s family occasionally played a game around the house and asked him if he could go play football somewhere, where would he be?

He would answer Texas and wonder what it would be like to be a Longhorn.

In about a month, the former Billings Senior star and Montana Grizzly will find out. On Thursday, Sulser confirmed to The Billings Gazette and 406mtsports.com that he was transferring to Texas after entering the transfer portal last week. The Montana Television Network first reported Sulser’s intentions.

Sulser will graduate from Montana on May 14, then pack his bags for Austin, Texas, where he is scheduled to report in late May. Sulser still has two years of eligibility, which syncs perfectly with the two years it will take to earn his master’s degree in public affairs.

“It’s pretty cool coming full circle,” Sulser said Thursday night, recalling those earlier family discussions. “I hadn’t necessarily planned it that way, but when I realized I might have the opportunity, I knew I had to take it.”

Seeking what he considered a “fresh start,” Sulser entered the NCAA transfer portal and contacted Texas, where former Montana State head coach Jeff Choate is the inside linebackers coach and co-defensive coordinator.

Choate attempted to recruit Sulser to MSU, and Sulser scored a touchdown against the Bobcats in 2018.

“It will be nice to know a familiar face and to know someone I developed a relationship with in high school,” Sulser said. “It will certainly be heartwarming and it won’t feel so foreign to me when I get there.”

The Texas coaching staff was ready to give Sulser a try, he said, and it didn’t take long for him to make the decision.

Sulser was Montana’s Gatorade Football Player of the Year in 2017 and helped the Broncs win Class AA state titles in 2016 and 2017. After graduating in 2018, he joined the Grizzlies and , as a true freshman, caught nine passes for 114 yards and three touchdowns and rushed for 137 yards and another score.

He played six games as a sophomore before COVID hit the following season, which limited the Grizzlies to two games in the spring of 2021. In the fall of that year, Sulser was limited to four games due to knee injury and was able to use the campaign as a redshirt year, leaving him two more years for the Longhorns.

“I’m just looking forward to competing against the best and proving to myself that I can hang on to these guys and help them any way I can,” Sulser said. “You know, it helped me to have played against some teams (Football Bowl Subdivision) during my time here, against Washington (in 2021) and Oregon (2019).

“I was able to play in those two games, so I felt pretty comfortable in those settings.”

While at Montana, Sulser played in 21 total games, rushing for 165 yards and a touchdown. He caught 35 passes for 414 yards and five other scores, and he averaged 28.8 yards on four kickoff returns and 18.2 yards on 12 punt returns.

Sulser said he was grateful for his time in Montana, but “at the end of the day, it just wasn’t the place for me anymore and I wish them the best.” I hope they come out next year and win it all. We will always be rooting for them.

As for a role in Texas, Sulser said that hasn’t been decided. He said he was under no illusions and knew that passing Montana and the Texas Football Championship Subdivision and the Big 12 Conference would be significant.

He can’t help but look forward to the experience, however, now that he has, as he said, come full circle.

“I certainly know it’s a heavy level of football, but at the same time it’s not just about the football aspect,” he said. “It’s so cool to be part of a program, so I’m really grateful for this opportunity.

“It’s definitely going to be a deal where I’m not going to come in and immediately have an impact role. I’m going to have to earn everything I get, and I’m well aware of that. But I’m really looking forward to it. »


College National Finals Rodeo Champion Excited to Represent Grizzlies at UM Rodeo


Gabe Sulser transferred to Texas

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Judge asks if Colstrip laws pass federal rally | Montana News https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/judge-asks-if-colstrip-laws-pass-federal-rally-montana-news/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 23:30:00 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/judge-asks-if-colstrip-laws-pass-federal-rally-montana-news/ What-if questions came from all directions as a roomful of lawyers explained what the Montana Legislature meant when it passed laws rewriting a 40-year-old contract governing two aging Colstrip power plants. Federal magistrate Kathleen DeSoto rarely let attorneys for Talen Energy, NorthWestern Energy, Montana State Attorney General Austen Knudsen or a phalanx of energy companies […]]]>

What-if questions came from all directions as a roomful of lawyers explained what the Montana Legislature meant when it passed laws rewriting a 40-year-old contract governing two aging Colstrip power plants.

Federal magistrate Kathleen DeSoto rarely let attorneys for Talen Energy, NorthWestern Energy, Montana State Attorney General Austen Knudsen or a phalanx of energy companies in Washington and Oregon get more than a page in their binders. before sorting out their claims.

What if the 1981 contract between six co-owners of Colstrip Units 3 and 4 were changed, so disputes had to be settled in Montana instead of Washington? What if Montana orders private companies to continue supporting a declining coal-fired power plant even though those companies’ states have banned coal-burning investment? What if one attorney general promises not to use powerful new laws favoring Montana, but the next one breaks the deal?

In particular, DeSoto questioned why Talen thought it was possible for the court to rewrite state law to clarify vague but powerful sections giving Montana the power to fine condo owners hundreds of thousands of dollars. of Colstrip for withdrawing from their partnership. She also questioned how Colstrip’s defenders thought a law forcing outside companies to take big business losses to benefit Montana interests was not “economic protectionism” specifically prohibited by the interstate commerce clause of the law. American Constitution.

Majority owners Puget Sound Energy, Avista Corp., PacifiCorp and Portland General Electric have all announced plans to exit Colstrip by the end of 2025. This has made them uninterested in investing in Colstrip’s future.

Power plants have major problems. Boiler damage in Unit 4 cost $20 million in repairs in 2019. And a recent investigation found Units 3 and 4 malfunctioned for 77 days in 2018. Both units were offline again for an in-depth interview in the spring of 2021.

The 2021 Legislature passed two laws, SB 265 and SB 266, that changed the way management disputes are resolved over Colstrip’s operations. SB 265 rewrote the arbitration section of the 1981 contract, requiring the hearings to be held in Montana instead of Washington and changing the types of arbitrators who would decide the hearings. SB 266 gave Montana’s attorney general the power to impose $100,000-a-day fines on any homeowner who blocked attempts to fix Colstrip’s aging power plants or cut its budget.

Talen’s attorney, Robert Sterup, proposed that the easiest solution is for DeSoto to interpret the laws from the bench. So where the law said Montana AG could impose fines for “conduct” injuring Colstrip, the court could clarify that this did not include pleading to stop paying Colstrip’s bills.

“It’s rewriting the law, I would say,” DeSoto replied. The legislature was in a much better position to write down exactly what that meant in law, she said, rather than leaving it up to a judge to define it.

Steup countered that judges are also expected to do whatever they can to resolve cases without ruling on state or federal constitutions. In other words, if there is a simple solution that does not involve the interpretation of a constitutional clause, the judge should take it. He suggested that DeSoto adding his own definition of “driving” would.

Harry Wilson, lead attorney for the owners in the Pacific Northwest, said the lack of clarity made it difficult for the Washington and Oregon utility co-owners to know what the rules of the agreement were. He was particularly critical of the lack of response from Attorney General Knudsen’s office, which did not tell the court how it intends to handle its enforcement power over fines or the arbitration process.

The Colstrip community itself was not part of the contract, but is in the lawsuit as a friend of the court. Colstrip attorney Michelle Sullivan argued the laws were necessary to preserve Montanans’ access to reliable power.

“I represent people that it will have an impact if Colstrip becomes a ghost town,” Sullivan said. “The legislature wasn’t punishing PNOs (Pacific Northwest landowners) – it was guaranteeing access to coal-fired electricity.”

“Isn’t that the definition of economic protectionism? DeSoto shot back. “It’s a really bad deal, but does it help us?”

U.S. District Judge Susan Watters has already imposed a preliminary injunction blocking both Montana laws. DeSoto’s magistrate hearing on Tuesday was intended to flesh out arguments why Watters’ decision should not be permanent and the laws taken off the books.

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