Oregon – Heart Of America Northwest http://heartofamericanorthwest.org/ Thu, 19 May 2022 23:29:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-49.png Oregon – Heart Of America Northwest http://heartofamericanorthwest.org/ 32 32 Ballot fiasco delays results in mail-in voting pioneer Oregon https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/ballot-fiasco-delays-results-in-mail-in-voting-pioneer-oregon/ Thu, 19 May 2022 23:29:43 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/ballot-fiasco-delays-results-in-mail-in-voting-pioneer-oregon/ Placeholder while loading article actions OREGON CITY, Ore. – Thousands of ballots with fuzzy barcodes that cannot be read by vote-counting machines will delay results by weeks in a key U.S. race in The Oregon primary election, a shocking development that puts a black eye on a pioneering mail-in voting state with a national reputation […]]]>
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OREGON CITY, Ore. – Thousands of ballots with fuzzy barcodes that cannot be read by vote-counting machines will delay results by weeks in a key U.S. race in The Oregon primary election, a shocking development that puts a black eye on a pioneering mail-in voting state with a national reputation as a leader in voter access and fairness.

The fiasco affects up to 60,000 ballots, two-thirds of the roughly 90,000 returned so far in Oregon‘s third-largest county. Hundreds of ballots were still arriving under a new law that allows them to be counted as long as they are postmarked on Election Day, and 200 Clackamas County workers were undergoing a crash course Thursday on the counting of votes after being redeployed to deal with the crisis.

Election workers must remove defective ballots from batches of 125, transfer the voter’s intent to a new ballot, then recheck their entries – a painstaking process that could extend the election until June 13, when Oregon certifies its vote. The workers operate in pairs, a Democrat and a Republican, in two shifts of 11 hours a day.

Voters from both political parties moved through a narrow room with windows that allowed workers to see the workers opening the ballots, transferring the votes, examining the marked ballots and operating the counting machines. They expressed shock at the mistake and anger at the slow response of embattled election clerk Sherry Hall, who has held the elected office for nearly 20 years. As of Wednesday evening, workers had counted 15,649.

“It takes my breath away,” said Ron Smith, a Clackamas County voter. “It’s a bit debatable. That’s why I’m here. … With everything going on, we don’t need any further suspicion. It looks like something like this would have been tested correctly at the start of this whole process.

The debacle stunned Oregon, where all ballots were cast only by mail for 23 years and lawmakers have consistently pushed to expand voter access through automatic voter registration, extended deadlines and to other measures. It is also in question a key race of the American House in a redesigned district that includes much of Clackamas County, which spans nearly 2,000 square miles (5,180 square kilometers), from the liberal southern suburbs from Portland to conservative rural communities on the flanks of Mount Hood.

In the Democratic primary for Oregon’s 5th congressional district, seven-term Rep. Kurt Schrader, a moderate, trailed in the vote behind progressive challenger Jamie McLeod-Skinner. The result could have an outsized impact in November, with the possibility that voters could flip the seat for the GOP.

Hall said the problem came to light on May 3, when workers submitted the first returned ballots to the counting machine. About 70 or 80 ballots from each batch of 125 were spat out as unreadable because their barcodes were fainter and slightly blurry. It was too late to print and send new ballots, she said.

As Election Day approached and ballots piled up, Hall said she allowed poll workers to take the weekend off because only three people signed up to work Saturday or Sunday. “We have people mostly in their 70s to 85s” and they need some rest, she said.

The secretary of state’s office said Hall refused help, saying Clackamas County could handle the situation. Hall told The Associated Press that several county staff were assigned to the ballot issue on May 11, a week after it surfaced.

Kathy Selvaggio, who lives in the county’s most urban and affluent suburbs, looked out the windows Thursday to watch the vote count.

“Mail-in voting works, it works well here, but it undermines my faith in (Hall),” said Selvaggio, who was there as a volunteer for the McLeod-Skinner campaign.

Hall said his department had discussed running test bulletins from the printer before they were mailed out, but his office had used the printer in question for 10 years without any issues. .

“There are a lot of other jobs to do,” Hall, who is up for re-election in November, told AP. “I hate that this happened with our ballots. It’s horrible. We have to build trust with voters and it’s not a trustworthy coin, but we’re doing what we can.

This isn’t the first time Hall has come under fire in her campaign role. In 2012, a temporary election worker was sentenced to 90 days in jail after admitting to tampering with two ballots. In 2014, Hall was criticized for using the phrase “Democratic Party” – a pejorative used by Republicans to demean Democrats – on a primary ballot instead of the Democratic Party.

Oregon Secretary of State Shemia Fagan said she was “deeply concerned” about the most recent situation, and her office released a statement on Tuesday calling the delay “unacceptable.” But state election officials said Thursday they have little authority over local county election officials.

“The independence of county clerks is an important part of the electoral system and at this time we are focused on supporting them,” agency spokesman Ben Morris said.

State law does not require county election officials to run ballots through their machines before mailing them.

Christopher Stout, an associate professor of political science at Oregon State University, said he wouldn’t be surprised to see legislation to change that.

“I think all of these issues, of course, are bad in the short term,” he said. “But in the long run, they will lead to improvements, because people will see that these things are problems and they will find ways to improve them.”

Former Oregon House Minority Leader Christine Drazan was closely watching the statewide results Tuesday night. She was ultimately declared the winner of the GOP governor’s primary the following night.

“I understood going into election night that Clackamas County knew this was a challenge,” Drazan said. “So the fact that we weren’t quite there on election night was just a fact that we had to accept and find out more about how the county was going to react to that.”

She said voters concerned about the integrity of the process should come watch it in person.

“He should have been dealt with sooner with this level of urgency, but it’s quite rare to have a printing issue like this,” Drazan said.

Cline reported from Portland, Oregon.

Follow Gillian Flaccus on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/gflaccus

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Hampton wins Pac-12 javelin title https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/hampton-wins-pac-12-javelin-title/ Sat, 14 May 2022 06:15:56 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/hampton-wins-pac-12-javelin-title/ EUGENE, Oregon – Freshman in red shirt Ty Hampton won the Pac-12 men’s javelin title Friday night at the Pac-12 Championships, leading a 22-point collection for the Oregon men in the event. Oregon also recorded a second performance of Alessia Zarbo in the women’s 10,000 meters and a pair of bronze medals by Aaron Bienenfeld […]]]>

EUGENE, Oregon – Freshman in red shirt Ty Hampton won the Pac-12 men’s javelin title Friday night at the Pac-12 Championships, leading a 22-point collection for the Oregon men in the event. Oregon also recorded a second performance of Alessia Zarbo in the women’s 10,000 meters and a pair of bronze medals by Aaron Bienenfeld (10K men) and Kohana Nakato (women’s javelin).

Thanks to three scored events, the OU men are in first place with 28 points, ahead of Stanford (27 points) and Washington (20). On the women’s side, the Ducks are in fifth place with 14 points at the end of the first day; Washington (32) leads through four scored events.

In Friday’s preliminary rounds, the Oregon men advanced seven athletes to Sunday’s finals, including four in the 1,500 metres. The Oregon women won five qualifiers on day one, including three in the 200 meters.

Access to the Sunday finals
MEN

200m: Micah Williams (20.73), Ryan Mulholland (20.95)
1500m: Reed Brown (3:43.38), Jack Yearian (3:43.68), James Gormley (3:43.79), Elliott Cook (3:43.99)
400m hurdles: Will Mundy (51.99)
WOMEN
200m: Iman Brown (11:40 p.m.), Kemba Nelson (23.68), Jasmine Montgomery (23.67)
1500m: Izzy Thornton Bott (4:20.83)
400m hurdles: Alexandra Webster (58.89)

In the decathlon, double title holder Max Vollmer leads the way with her UO teammates Jett Kinder and Nathan Poff in second and third, respectively, through five events. Vollmer set outdoor records in the 100 meters (10.72) and high jump (1.96m/6-5) en route to 4,078 points after day one.

Native Eugene Taylor Chocek put on a solid first day in the heptathlon and ranks third overall on Saturday with 3,290 points. She capped off the day with a lifetime best of 25.09 in the 200 metres.

The combined events resume on Saturday at 11 a.m. with the 110-meter hurdles decathlon and 1 p.m. in the heptathlon with the long jump.

With his victory, Hampton becomes the 17and man in program history to win a conference javelin title, and the first since Cody Danielson in 2016. The North Bend, Oregon native posted the fastest time of 73.86m/242-4 in his second attempt of the day, nearly 20 feet from runner-up Roan Allen of Washington. Hampton’s six marks were good enough to win.

The Ducks 1-3-5-7 was also featured Eric Lyons, Dalton Rasmussen and Asher Krauel, respectively. Lyon (66.29m/217-6) and Rasmussen (65.15m/213-9) gained a place in the final standings on the last three throws of the event. Kraul’s best throw of the day at 62.36m/204-7 came in the second round.

Zarbo, in her college debut in the 10,000 meters, clocked 32:28.57 to collect eight points for the Oregon women. She led at the bell and only gave up the lead for the last 100 meters. The top four in Friday’s final all finished below the previous meet record of 32:38.73 set last season by Carmela Cardama Baez in Los Angeles.

With Friday’s outing, Zarbo becomes No. 3 on the OU’s all-time list behind Cardama Baez (32:16.13) and school record holder Jordan Hasay (32:06.64).

Oregon’s first points of the weekend came from Nakato who finished just short of his season best metric with a 48.45m/158-11 throw in the third round. She went from fifth to third going into the finals and held steady to score six points for the OU Women in her Pac-12 debut.

In the final event on Friday, the UO men took six points from Bienenfeld in his first 10,000 meters of the season. He crossed the finish line in 28:14.67, not the best of his life (28:10.95), but strong enough to become the fifth fastest player in UO history. Bienenfeld is the first OU man to make the program’s top 10 since Edward Cheserek in 2014.

In addition to his third-place finish, Bienenfeld added a regional top-10 mark for the NCAA West preliminary qualifier. Bienenfeld and Zarbo are scheduled for the long distance double with the 5,000 meters on Sunday afternoon.

Saturday’s finals in the field events begin at 1:45 p.m. with the men’s hammerhead while the track preliminaries continue at 4 p.m. with the women’s 100-meter hurdles. Day two of the Pac-12 Championships will see the champions crowned in the men’s and women’s steeplechase, men’s and women’s long jump, men’s and women’s shot put, men’s hammer and combined events.

Friday results
MEN

200 meters – preliminary
3. Micah Williams – 20.73Q
7. Ryan Mulholland – 20.95Q
14. Xavier Naire – 9:51 p.m.

1500 meters – preliminary
2. Reed brown – 3:43.38Q
4. Jack Yearian – 3:43.68Q
6. James Gormley – 3:43.79Q
8. Elliott Cook – 3:43.99Q
13. Evan Holland – 3:44.91

10,000 meters – final
3. Aaron Bienenfeld – 28:14.67 [6 points] [No. 5 UO]

400m hurdles – preliminary
3. Will Mundy – 51.99Q

Javelin
1. Ty Hampton – 73.86m/242-4 [10 points]

3. Eric Lyons – 66.29m/217-6 [6 points]

5. Dalton Rasmussen – 65.15m/213-9 [4 points]

7. Asher Krauel – 62.36m/204-7 [2 points]

Decathlon – Day 1
1. Max Vollmer – 4,078 points
1. 100 meters – 10.72 (RP) [924 points]

2. Long Jump – 6.88m/22-7 [785]

1. Shot Put – 13.95m/45-9.25 [725]

2. High jump – 1.96m/6-5 (PR) [767]

1. 400 meters – 48.67 [877]

2. Jett Kinder – 3,739 points
5. 100 meters – 11:30 a.m. (RP) [795 points]

1. Long Jump – 7.10m/23-3.5 [838]

2. Shot Put – 13.51m/44-4 [698]

3. High Jump – 1.93m/6-4 [740]

6. 400 meters – 53.32 [668]

3. Nathan Poff – 3,645 points
5. 100 meters – 11.17 [823 points]

3. Long Jump – 6.77m/22-25 [760]

5. Shot put – 12.47m/40-11 [635]

4. High Jump – 1.81m/5-11.25 [636]

3. 400 meters – 50.51 [791]

WOMEN

200 meters – preliminaries
2. Iman Brown – 23.40Q
4. Kemba Nelson – 23.68Q
6. Jasmine Montgomery – 23.67Q
15. Jasmine Reed – 24:25

1500 meters – preliminary
8. Izzy Thornton Bott – 4:20.83Q
15. Emilie Girard – 4:25.37

10,000 meters – final
2. Alessia Zarbo – 32:28.57 [No. 3 UO] [8 points]

16. Caramia Mixer – 34:36.55

400m hurdles – preliminary
2. Alexandra Webster – 58.89Q

Javelin
3. Kohana Nakato – 48.45m/158-11 [6 points]

Heptathlon – Day 1
3. Taylor Chocek – 3,290 points
5. 100m hurdles – 14.04 [973 points]

3. High jump – 1.67m/5-5.75 (=PR) [818]

5. Shot put – 11.38m/37-4 [620]

5. 200 meters – 25.09 (PR) [879]

For more Oregon cross country and track and field news and information, follow @OregonTF on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

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Multnomah County urges everyone to wear masks indoors | Oregon News https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/multnomah-county-urges-everyone-to-wear-masks-indoors-oregon-news/ Thu, 12 May 2022 01:13:00 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/multnomah-county-urges-everyone-to-wear-masks-indoors-oregon-news/ PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Multnomah County health officials in Portland, Ore., are asking people to wear masks indoors until new COVID-19 numbers and hospitalizations begin to decline . Health worker Dr Jennifer Vines said it was not a mandate but a request that everyone put their masks back on for a few weeks as they […]]]>

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Multnomah County health officials in Portland, Ore., are asking people to wear masks indoors until new COVID-19 numbers and hospitalizations begin to decline .

Health worker Dr Jennifer Vines said it was not a mandate but a request that everyone put their masks back on for a few weeks as they go to the school, work and other indoor events, The Oregonian/OregonLive reported. Authorities are strongly recommending that people wear masks in schools.

County officials have not set a case or hospitalization threshold for when they would consider mandating masks, a health department spokesperson said.

Multnomah County is averaging about 350 new cases a day, down from less than 100 in early April.

The current wave of COVID-19 is expected to peak in about a month, according to forecasts from Oregon Health & Science University.

political cartoons

Neighboring Clackamas and Washington counties have not recommended universal indoor masking. Both are also in the “medium” COVID-19 risk category and have seen the same or higher case rates over the past week than Multnomah County.

Multnomah County officials also suggested people at high risk for severe COVID-19 consider avoiding crowded indoor environments for the next few weeks.

Copyright 2022 The Associated press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Molotov cocktails thrown at office of Oregon anti-abortion group https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/molotov-cocktails-thrown-at-office-of-oregon-anti-abortion-group/ Tue, 10 May 2022 01:04:00 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/molotov-cocktails-thrown-at-office-of-oregon-anti-abortion-group/ MOlotov cocktails were thrown at the offices of an anti-abortion group in Oregon overnight Sunday, according to local authorities. The Oregon Right to Life building in Keizer was the target of the attack, in which one or more suspects caught fire and threw two Molotov cocktails at the building and started a small fire around […]]]>

MOlotov cocktails were thrown at the offices of an anti-abortion group in Oregon overnight Sunday, according to local authorities.

The Oregon Right to Life building in Keizer was the target of the attack, in which one or more suspects caught fire and threw two Molotov cocktails at the building and started a small fire around 10:30 p.m. Sunday, the Department of keizer font mentioned Monday.

The fire did little damage to the building, police said. No one was inside at the time.

WISCONSIN ANTI-ABORTION GROUP HEADQUARTERS VANDALIZED

“Understandably, our team is shaken by this attack. We are committed to taking the necessary precautions to protect the safety of our staff as we move forward,” Lois Anderson, executive director of Oregon Right to Life, said in a statement. . statement.

The advocacy group has a “longstanding opposition to the use of force, intimidation and violence by anyone pursuing pro-life activities”.

“Just as we condemn abortion and euthanasia, we oppose private acts that take human life, inflict bodily harm or destroy the property of others,” the statement read.

Police are investigating the incident – the latest by vandals targeting anti-abortion groups as people act in response to a leaked draft notice saying the Supreme Court is set to overturn Roe vs. Wade.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

On Saturday, Wisconsin’s Madison Family Action headquarters was hit by at least one Molotov cocktail and vandalized with the words “If abortions aren’t safe, then neither are you” graffitied on the side of the building.

The Loreto House, a pregnancy center in Denton, Texas, was also vandalized Friday night. The words “Forced pregnancy is murder” and “Not a clinic” were spray-painted on the building, the Catholic News Agency reported.

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‘Outsider’ appears to be winning in Oregon’s Democratic gubernatorial primary https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/outsider-appears-to-be-winning-in-oregons-democratic-gubernatorial-primary/ Sun, 08 May 2022 03:22:14 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/outsider-appears-to-be-winning-in-oregons-democratic-gubernatorial-primary/ PORTLAND — Months before Oregon’s Democratic primary, many thought the race was up for former House Speaker Tina Kotek. The progressive’s political resume, leadership experience and support from his colleagues put the Portland lawmaker in an enviable position. But Oregon Treasurer Tobias Read hopes to capitalize on voter unrest and an apparent return to moderates […]]]>

PORTLAND — Months before Oregon’s Democratic primary, many thought the race was up for former House Speaker Tina Kotek.

The progressive’s political resume, leadership experience and support from his colleagues put the Portland lawmaker in an enviable position.

But Oregon Treasurer Tobias Read hopes to capitalize on voter unrest and an apparent return to moderates when Democrats choose their May 17 nominee for the state’s top office.

Read, Kotek’s most important primary opponent, has been gaining ground over the past two months. The 46-year-old has been endorsed by two former Oregon governors, drawing supporters from Nicholas Kristof – a former New York Times columnist who was declared ineligible to run for governor due to non- compliance with residency requirements — and placed some of the blame for Oregon’s troubles directly on Kotek.

Christopher Stout, an associate professor of political science at Oregon State University, said a recent poll shows the May 17 primary is close with Read within “striking distance” of Kotek and more than half of Democrats staying. undecided.

Winning the Democratic primary usually means an almost certain victory in the fall, as a Republican has not been governor of Oregon for 35 years. But this year, longtime former Democratic senator Betsy Johnson is running as an independent and should be a strong candidate in November. Johnson does not have to participate in a primary.

Many Oregonians are critical of the handling of the pandemic, homelessness crisis, school closures, lack of affordable housing, rising gun violence and a growing political divide.

During a recent debate, the two candidates were asked to use a word or phrase to describe Oregon right now. Kotek said, “It’s always beautiful.” Read replied, “Tense.”

Read says that in conversations with voters, he can hear their “visceral sense of anger, dissatisfaction and anxiety” that stems from a “lack of follow-up”, including delays in unemployment benefits, the dispersing housing assistance checks and rolling out the state’s long-awaited paid family and medical leave program.

“You can’t just take credit for the good stuff and not take some responsibility for what’s delayed,” Read told Kotek during a recent debate. Kotek rebutted saying state agencies are overseen by Governor Kate Brown, who can no longer run for office due to term limits.

Stout says Read is trying to position himself as “an outsider,” a move that could benefit him as many residents are unhappy with the status quo in Oregon. Oregonians’ dissatisfaction with current politics was evidenced in Brown’s historically low approval ratings. Opponents of Kotek have dubbed her “Kate Brown 2.0” – both are liberal women who have represented Portland and identify as LGBTQ.

“To say, ‘Look, we’ve kind of been through this process before. As an outsider, I can actually change things. It could be effective,'” Stout said.

Read, who grew up in a middle-class neighborhood in Boise, Idaho, got his first taste of life in Oregon when he attended Willamette University in Salem, where he joined the campaigns and staff of local legislators.

In 1999, he moved to Washington, D.C., where he worked in the U.S. Treasury Department as an executive assistant to Sheryl Sandberg, who at the time was chief of staff to then-Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers. . Sandberg is now the COO of Meta, which owns Facebook and Instagram.

Read returned to the Pacific Northwest in 2001 to earn an MBA from the University of Washington. He says the degree helped him understand how to marry the interests of private enterprise and government.

Although he presents himself as an outsider, Read has spent years immersed in Oregon politics.

The Democrat won his first legislative race in 2006 and served in the state House of Representatives for a decade, where he focused on economic issues – serving on the House Revenues Committee, chairing the the House on Transportation and Economic Development, being elected Speaker pro tempore and a member of the Legislative Assembly’s senior budget-writing body.

“He has shown throughout his career that he can do great things. From graduating from full-day kindergarten to implementing the state’s first retirement savings program, Tobias delivered on his promises,” said Sheryl WuDunn, wife of ineligible gubernatorial candidate Nicholas. Kristof.

In 2016, Read was elected state treasurer. He is the custodian of public funds, chief investment officer and overseer of the growth of assets held by Oregon public retirees from $73 billion in 2017 to more than $100 billion in 2022.

Read said his experience in legislative and executive office sets him apart from other gubernatorial candidates. “I think that’s another very important distinction and contrast in racing,” he said.

Former colleagues on both sides of the aisle described him as hardworking, gentle and pragmatic.

While Kotek has received far more support — including a third of current Oregon lawmakers, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, labor unions and big organizations like Planned Parenthood — Read got the coveted green light of Barbara Roberts, Oregon’s first female governor. She says the state “needs a governor with a statewide record to tackle the tough issues.”

In the eyes of some, Read also positioned himself as more moderate.

The split between progressives and moderates within the party became increasingly evident.

The battle lines drawn in the 2020 primaries — largely between liberals like Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and Warren and a group of moderates from which President Joe Biden hails — continue to overshadow the party in elections. 2021 elections, especially in some of the more liberal cities in the country. , including Seattle and New York.

Stout says that although progressives and moderates have different names, they are nearly the same in other ways, with “very similar” voting records and ideals – as seen with Read and Kotek.

Regarding the homelessness crisis, the two say they would be more aggressive in addressing the issue, expanding the availability of shelters and providing more affordable housing options. Both say it is important to adequately fund the police. Both are committed to protecting access to abortion. And both are taking strong stances with ambitious climate change goals.

When The Associated Press asked him if Read identified as a moderate, he replied, “I’m a Democrat. I’m happy to let others describe the positioning or etiquette associated with this.

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Prosecutors: Man shot dead, roommate dismembered | Oregon https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/prosecutors-man-shot-dead-roommate-dismembered-oregon/ Fri, 06 May 2022 12:10:37 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/prosecutors-man-shot-dead-roommate-dismembered-oregon/ SEATTLE (AP) — King County prosecutors say a suburban Seattle man has been charged with premeditated first-degree murder, charged with shooting and dismembering his roommate. Charging documents say Nicholas Van Cleave of Federal Way was arrested this week after family members of Richard Lavietes, 41, contacted police, entered his apartment with a spare key and […]]]>

SEATTLE (AP) — King County prosecutors say a suburban Seattle man has been charged with premeditated first-degree murder, charged with shooting and dismembering his roommate.

Charging documents say Nicholas Van Cleave of Federal Way was arrested this week after family members of Richard Lavietes, 41, contacted police, entered his apartment with a spare key and found two garbage bags filled with what appeared to be human remains, The Seattle Times reported.

Court records do not yet indicate which attorney is representing Van Cleave, who remains jailed in lieu of $2 million bond.

A co-worker called 911 Monday and requested a wellness check on Lavietes, the charging documents say. She told a dispatcher she was worried because Lavietes took a gun from her roommate, whom she described as mentally unstable, according to the documents.

People also read…

Police say Lavietes and Van Cleave were friends and that Lavietes invited Van Cleave to live with him last year because Van Cleave was having trouble keeping a job, according to the charges.

A relative told detectives that Lavietes told Van Cleave he had to move out after Van Cleave brought the gun home last week, according to charging documents.

The King County Medical Examiner’s Office determined that Lavietes was shot five times in the back of the neck, according to the charges, which indicate that Lavietes was then dismembered.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Lawmakers in 19 states, including Oregon and Washington, want legal refuge for trans youth https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/lawmakers-in-19-states-including-oregon-and-washington-want-legal-refuge-for-trans-youth/ Tue, 03 May 2022 14:25:54 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/lawmakers-in-19-states-including-oregon-and-washington-want-legal-refuge-for-trans-youth/ Democratic lawmakers in more than a dozen states are following California’s lead in seeking to provide legal refuge for displaced transgender youth and their families. The coordinated effort announced Tuesday by the LGBTQ Victory Institute and other advocates comes in response to recent moves in conservative states. In Texas, for example, Governor Gregg Abbott ordered […]]]>

Democratic lawmakers in more than a dozen states are following California’s lead in seeking to provide legal refuge for displaced transgender youth and their families.

The coordinated effort announced Tuesday by the LGBTQ Victory Institute and other advocates comes in response to recent moves in conservative states. In Texas, for example, Governor Gregg Abbott ordered state agencies to consider placing transgender children in foster care, despite a judge Temporarily blocked such investigations. And several states have approved measures banning gender-affirming health treatments for transgender youth.

To combat such measures, lawmakers in Minnesota and New York recently introduced safe haven legislation modeled after the bill proposed in March by Senator Scott Wiener of California. Democrats in 16 other states plan to do the same, though about half of their legislatures are out of session or not currently accepting new bills.

Wiener said he immediately began hearing from other states after introducing his bill, which would overturn any out-of-state court judgments removing children from their parents’ custody because they authorized care. gender-affirming healthcare. It would also make arrest warrants based on the alleged violation of another state’s law against receiving such care the lowest priority for California law enforcement.

“We’re tired of just playing defense against what these red states are doing,” Wiener said in an interview Monday. “We will attack, we will protect LGBQT children and their families, and we will build a rainbow wall to protect our community.”

LGBTQ lawmakers from Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, from Vermont, Washington and West Virginia are also joining the effort.

Annise Parker, president and CEO of the Victory Institute, acknowledged the legislation is likely to fail in some states, but said it’s time to oppose the onslaught of bills targeting the LGBTQ community.

“This is our opportunity to drive the conversation and the debate, and to proactively call on our allies to step in instead of being targeted,” said Parker, who served as the first openly LGBTQ mayor of a major city. American when she ruled Houston for six years.

“We would like to see these bills in states where there are more progressive legislatures,” she said. “But we also think it’s important for trans children and their families to see and hear lawmakers in our community stand up and defend them.”

Wiener said it’s despicable that a family should consider moving to a new state to protect a child, but if that happens, he hopes as many states as possible will welcome them.

“When your child is threatened with eviction from your home, families will consider many different options, and we just want to be clear that if you decide this is the option for you, we will do our best to possible to do to welcome and protect you,” he said.

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Tumwater’s History Shows Oregon Trail Extended to Washington https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/tumwaters-history-shows-oregon-trail-extended-to-washington/ Sun, 01 May 2022 12:15:00 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/tumwaters-history-shows-oregon-trail-extended-to-washington/ A local historian has set out to put Tumwater on the map for national trail buffs and history buffs. David Nicandri, a member of the Tumwater Historic Preservation Commission, presented a resolution to the group on April 21 recommending that city council add the Cowlitz Trail segment of the Oregon Trail to the National Historic […]]]>

A local historian has set out to put Tumwater on the map for national trail buffs and history buffs.

David Nicandri, a member of the Tumwater Historic Preservation Commission, presented a resolution to the group on April 21 recommending that city council add the Cowlitz Trail segment of the Oregon Trail to the National Historic Trails system.

The recommendation would need to be passed by the city council, which would then pass it to the state legislature and then travel to Congress for final approval.

Nicandri said the effort to get the trail recognized has been going on for a few years now, led by the Oregon-California Trails Association. He is now in his last term on the commission and he thought it was time to push some projects forward.

He said the corridor that encompasses the trail has several levels of significance that are worth recognizing.

“It’s kind of a fulfillment of a long-standing interest in getting proper trail recognition here in Washington state,” he said.

Nicandri said there has always been a battle between Oregon and Washington over the trail system and where the Oregon and Lewis and Clark trails end.

“It’s commonly designed where the Oregon Trail begins, which was Independence, Missouri, and surrounding towns on the lower Missouri,” he said. “There’s kind of a consensus about where the trail ends, Oregon City, but we know it branched off from there.”

He said Oregon has always done a better job of publicizing and promoting the history of its trail systems, casting a shadow over Washington’s history. People didn’t really pay much attention to the north side of the Columbia River until the expansion of the transcontinental rail network.

But Tumwater was the first place in Washington where Americans settled, after a group of families on the Oregon Trail found the Willamette Valley unwelcoming in 1844. Because members of the Simmons- Bush were black, they were discouraged from settling with others in Oregon, moving them to try their luck with the British at Fort Vancouver.

Nicandri said the history of racial justice and transcontinental migration should be reason enough for the Cowlitz Trail to be recognized as an alternative route to the Oregon Trail. But if that’s not enough, his story as a former Native American Travel Itinerarya historic highway and railroad should sweeten the deal.

Nicandri said the Brewery Park in Tumwater Falls, where the Cowlitz Trail ends and meets the start of Tumwater’s story, receives hundreds of thousands of visitors each year. He hopes the official recognition of the trail segment will kick-start other projects, such as adding signage throughout the park and in the I-5 corridor.

He said he wishes he could bring more attention to Bush Farm and Falls Park.

“If we can get the segment recognized, we can bring more public attention to it, build the interpretive infrastructure here, and farm it,” he said. “We can add to the historical aspects that the community already has.”

Nicandri said he’s learned that these projects are best approached on a step-by-step basis, and he hopes the commission’s recommendation will move things forward.

“I think it’s worth acknowledging and I’ve made my best point,” he said. “The main takeaway is to get formal acknowledgment of these things, you have to put in the effort. The resolution was just a starting block, there is more to come.

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Oregon State at Oregon Live Stream: Watch Softball Online for Free – How to Watch & Stream Major League & College Sports https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/oregon-state-at-oregon-live-stream-watch-softball-online-for-free-how-to-watch-stream-major-league-college-sports/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/oregon-state-at-oregon-live-stream-watch-softball-online-for-free-how-to-watch-stream-major-league-college-sports/ Oregon State has been in a slump and on Friday it will finally look to get out of it when it starts a series with rival Oregon. How to watch Oregon State at Oregon in Women’s College Softball today: Date of the game: April 29, 2022 Game time: 9:00 p.m. ET TV: Pac-12 network Live […]]]>

Oregon State has been in a slump and on Friday it will finally look to get out of it when it starts a series with rival Oregon.

How to watch Oregon State at Oregon in Women’s College Softball today:

Date of the game: April 29, 2022

Game time: 9:00 p.m. ET

TV: Pac-12 network

Live Stream Oregon State to Oregon game on fuboTV: Start with a 7 day free trial!

The Beavers enter the weekend on a seven-game losing streak. It’s been tough for them as the last six losses have all ended in just one point.

On Friday, they led UCLA by three heading into the seventh but allowed five runs to take the loss. On Saturday they lost a game 3-2 and on Sunday their rally was narrowly faltered losing to the Bruins 4-3.

They didn’t play badly, but they just can’t get over the difficulty. On Friday, however, they will be looking to eliminate a Ducks team that has lost three in a row.

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Blue Devil track and field athletes compete in the Oregon Relays | High school sports https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/blue-devil-track-and-field-athletes-compete-in-the-oregon-relays-high-school-sports/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 03:30:00 +0000 https://heartofamericanorthwest.org/blue-devil-track-and-field-athletes-compete-in-the-oregon-relays-high-school-sports/ EUGENE, Ore. – Twenty-six Walla Walla High track and field athletes traveled to the University of Oregon on Friday and Saturday, April 22-23 for the Oregon Relays. Blue Devil Dash Sirmon stood out with his javelin victory, setting a new national leader mark with a throw of 213 feet, 2 inches, after previously winning the […]]]>

EUGENE, Ore. – Twenty-six Walla Walla High track and field athletes traveled to the University of Oregon on Friday and Saturday, April 22-23 for the Oregon Relays.

Blue Devil Dash Sirmon stood out with his javelin victory, setting a new national leader mark with a throw of 213 feet, 2 inches, after previously winning the event.

“It was absolutely brilliant to watch!” said Wa-Hi coach Eric Hisaw. “You knew when it came out of his hand that it was going to be big! He’s a great talent, he’s a great meet artist!”

The Oregon Relays are an invitation-only event.

“We were lucky to be invited to be part of it! Hisaw said. “Historic Hayward Field has been completely renovated, and after $220 million, it’s completely amazing! Our kids were able to be at one of the greatest track and field venues in the world for two days and we competed really well. It was a competition that had teams from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Nevada, Utah and California…and throughout the competition there was at least one athlete ranked in the top 10 nationally in each event.

“I was very proud of our children,” he said. “There are always ups and downs in competitions like this, but it’s a great learning opportunity because the stage really can’t get much bigger than this!

“Our hope as coaches is that this weekend helps expose our kids to a very pressured encounter, and it will not only calm their nerves later in the year, but build their confidence. And we had very successful children!”

Whitney Griffith finished 10th in discus throw, “and she was the only runner-up in best discus steal,” Hisaw said. “She did a terrific job fighting her nerves and throwing extremely well!”

Christopher Norris and Logan Ashbeck had very solid days in the javelin, both finishing in the top 12 with their best throws being their last throws.

“That says a lot about their composure and mental toughness,” Hisaw said.

Eddie Vu finished third with a lifetime record in the discus, and Camden McCollaugh had a lifetime record in the shot put.

“It was so exciting to see them throwing one in this meet!” Hisaw said. “They’re both on great pace right now and are starting to throw really well.

“Brody Hartley was also exciting, he ran the second fastest time in school history on Friday night!” he said. “He ran with a lot of composure and fought very hard to finish eighth.”

Carly Martin had a personal best of three seconds in the 800 meters, and Ava Nelson had a season best in the 400 meters, “and they were both part of a very strong 1,600 meter relay that ran its best time of the year!” Hisaw said. “Other relay members were Jailyn Davenport and Talia Billingsley.”

Lucy Kelly placed third in the women’s javelin.

“Just like our other pitchers, she’s very consistent and in a great rhythm with a lot more in the tank,” Hisaw said. “It’s going to be exciting to see her finish!

“Our boys 4×4 relays and our girls 4×200 relays also had their best times of the year and still have a lot of room for improvement,” he said.

Diego Jacquez finished eighth in his last jump of the long jump.

“He’s such a competitor and he really seized the opportunity when needed!” Hisaw said. “A real mark of a great competitor!”

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